How To Teach The P Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

One of the first sounds your child should be able to master is the /p/ sound. The /p/ sound falls under the “plosives” category of speech sounds. Like similar sounds (/b/, /t/, /k/) the /p/ sound is produced by the release of built up air pressure. The production of this sound is quick, non-lingering and highly visual, meaning it can be easily imitated …

How To Teach The M Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Your child should make the /m/ sound an addition to his or her speech by the time they reach two years old. However, don’t be surprised if you hear this sound pop up in your child’s verbal communication long before. Infants begin using this noise or at least attempting it at such a young age because it is produced by moving the lips …

How To Teach The H Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Around the age of two, your child should begin to incorporate the /h/ sound into her speech. However, /h/ can be one of the trickier sounds to teach or learn because it is a dependable sound—the position of the mouth while eliciting the /h/ sound depends on what sound will follow. For instance, the way ours mouths look when we begin the pronunciation …

How To Teach The N Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Along with the /m/ sound, /n/ should be learned very early on in your child’s speech development. These two sounds are also similar in that they are both considered vocal sounds, meaning use of the vocal chords is necessary for articulation, and they are both “nasal” speech sounds. During articulation the breath stream travels mostly through the nose. However, there is one large difference …

How To Teach The W Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Another sound your child should begin articulating at an early stage of language development—between two and three years old—is the /w/ sound. How to say it To make this sound, your child should narrow his or her lips and move them close together without them touching—in a rounded fashion. You might suggest pretending like he or she is drinking through a straw. During …

How To Teach The B Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

One of the most important things to address when your child begins learning to articulate the /b/ sound is differentiating between /b/ and /p/. Both sounds use the same mouth positions, however the difference is that /p/ is a voiceless sound and /b/ is voiced, meaning the vocal chords are used to produce it. This could be a difficult sound for your child to …

How To Teach The K Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Your child should begin learning to say the /k/ sound between the ages of two and four. The /k/ sound is often associated with the /g/ sound because both articulations require the same mouth position. How it’s elicited /k/ is an unvoiced sound. This means that when you say it, only air passes through your mouth, no verbal sounds. This is a “stop …

How To Teach The G Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Your child should begin learning to say the /g/ sound between the ages of two and four. The /g/ sound is often associated with the /k/ sound because both articulations require the same mouth position. How it’s elicited /g/ is a voiced sound. This means that when you say it, the air that passes through your mouth is accompanied by a verbal noise …

How To Teach The D Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Your child should begin learning to say the /d/ sound between the ages of two and four. The /d/ sound is often associated with the /t/ sound because both articulations require the same mouth position. How it’s elicited /d/ is a voiced sound. This means that when you say it, the air that passes through your mouth is accompanied by a verbal sound. …

How To Teach The T Sound To Toddlers by Chicago Speech Therapists Connect

Your child should begin learning to say the /t/ sound between the ages of two and six. The /t/ sound is often associated with the /d/ sound because both articulations require the same mouth position. How it’s elicited /t/ is an unvoiced sound. This means that when you say it, only air passes through your mouth. This is a “stop consonant” meaning there …